AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Aliya Sternstein

Senior Correspondent Aliya Sternstein reports on cybersecurity and homeland security systems for Nextgov. She has covered technology for nine years at such publications as National Journal's TechnologyDaily, Federal Computer Week and Forbes. Before joining Government Executive, she covered agriculture and derivatives trading for Congressional Quarterly. She has been a guest commentator on C-SPAN, WTOP and Federal News Radio. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.
Results 1411-1420 of 2050

U.S. doesn't have leadership, strategy to protect cyberspace globally

August 3, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Federal auditors issued a report on Monday warning the United States is missing the leadership and strategy needed to protect national interests in governing and securing global cyberspace. Neither the nation's senior-most cybersecurity official nor any interagency effort has the authority to manage cybersecurity on an international level, according to ...

EPA posts toxic data early to encourage crowdsourcing

August 2, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow EPA released the raw data on Toxics Release Inventory July 28.Thinkstock The Environmental Protection Agency posted online earlier than ever before the annual reports of toxic pollution industrial facilities release, a move the agency expects will improve data accuracy through crowdsourcing, EPA officials said on Friday. The agency on July ...

From Nextgov.com: EPA posts toxic pollution data early to encourage crowdsourcing

August 2, 2010 The Environmental Protection Agency posted online earlier than ever before the annual reports of toxic pollution industrial facilities release, a move the agency expects will improve data accuracy through crowdsourcing, EPA officials said on Friday. Read the full story on Nextgov.com.

The Science of Funding

August 1, 2010 John McGowan fosters teamwork on the Web to target promising medical research investments. The federal government, and consequently the taxpayer, is the largest funder of medical research in the world, with annual expenditures topping $30 billion. So it's no surprise that the officials who oversee this funding are under immense ...

DOD Blocks Access To Contractor Data, Again

July 30, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Obama administration - which prides itself on being the most open White House ever -- has rejected a Freedom of Information Act request for information in a new government website that agencies use to compile ratings of contractor performance. The Defense Department this week denied access to any of ...

Publisher argues free access to research violates administration's transparency initiative

July 30, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Free online access to federally funded research articles defies the White House's open government directive, a journal publisher told House members at a hearing on Thursday. A December 2009 presidential memo on transparency in government instructed federal agencies to abide by the precepts of public disclosure, civic engagement in policymaking ...

Repubs Knock Apparent FOIA Exemption

July 29, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Some Republicans are disgruntled about a clause in the newly-minted financial reform law that they say allows the Securities and Exchange Commission to sidestep the Freedom of Information Act. Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who sponsored a House-backed amendment that would have added data disclosure requirements throughout the legislation, this week ...

Moratorium on financial projects could leave staff in the lurch

July 28, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The uncertainty caused by the White House's recent move to halt development of all financial management systems for an unspecified period could affect talent retention and budgetary planning, according to some industry representatives and contracting reform activists. The White House in June put a blanket freeze on all financial system ...

Agencies begin to identify failing IT projects for high-risk list

July 28, 2010 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Federal agencies immediately will begin flagging about 30 high-risk information technology projects that could be scrapped in the fiscal 2012 budget if they are not improved by winter, the Office of Management and Budget announced on Wednesday. The move is part of a multistep initiative launched in June to identify ...

From Nextgov.com: Agencies begin to identify failing IT projects for high-risk list

July 28, 2010 Federal agencies immediately will begin flagging about 30 high-risk information technology projects that could be scrapped in the fiscal 2012 budget if they are not improved by winter, the Office of Management and Budget announced on Wednesday. Read the full story on Nextgov.com.