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Government Executive Editor in Chief Tom Shoop, along with other editors and staff correspondents, look at the federal bureaucracy from the outside in.
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Obama: It Shouldn’t Be So Hard to Fire Incompetent, Unethical Execs

One of the central provisions in the Veterans Affairs reform bill President Obama signed into law Thursday allows for the streamlined firing of VA senior executives for alleged misconduct. Under the law, VA Secretary Bob McDonald can fire any Senior Executive Service member immediately, and his or her only recourse is an expedited appeals process.

If there was any doubt about where Obama stood on that issue, he cleared it up at a  signing ceremony at Fort Belvoir, Va. And in the process, he hinted that he favored a streamlined firing process not just at the VA, but in government generally.

“We’re giving the VA secretary more authority to hold people accountable,” Obama said.  “We’ve got to give Bob the authority so that he can move quickly to remove senior executives who fail to meet the standards of conduct and competence that the American people demand. If you engage in an unethical practice, if you cover up a serious problem, you should be fired. Period. It shouldn’t be that difficult.”

The Senior Executives Association strongly opposed the provision, saying that it's actually "very easy" to fire SESers under the current system, provided agencies issue a 30-day ...

Former Postmaster General: Stop 'Prostituting' the Stamp Program

Add "angry ex-postmaster general" to the list of problems affecting the U.S. Postal Service.

Benjamin F. Bailar, who led the service from 1975 to 1978, has problems with current Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe's stewardship of the stamp program. In his letter resigning from the Citizens’ Advisory Stamp Committee, Bailar accused USPS of "prostituting" the program by issuing pop culture stamps in lieu of higher-minded cultural figures.

The Washington Post first reported the letter, which came after the board complained to Donahoe that they were being ignored in the decision-making affecting stamp issues. November's stamps featuring fictional British boy wizard Harry Potter were cited by members of the board as a cash-grab, as they had not been advised on the choice.

Bailar's letter does not pull punches about his feelings regarding such stamps.

The stamp program should celebrate the things that are great about the United States and serve as a medium to communicate those things to a world-wide audience... To prostitute that goal in the pursuit of possibly illusory profits does not make sense to me.

Bailar also said the committee has become too heavily weighted toward designers and he suggested that it be dissolved, "given ...

Is Burning Man Really a Government-Free Zone?

Last week, our friends at National Journal reported on Grover Norquist’s announcement that he would be attending this year’s Burning Man event in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert. This was noteworthy for two reasons:

  • Norquist is a buttoned-down, conservative, Washington-based longtime anti-tax activist.
  • Burning Man is an annual artistic adventure in radical self-expression in which attendees, as NJ put it, “dress up in crazy costumes, waltz around naked, take copious amounts of illicit substances, and generally do whatever they want.”

So what attracted Norquist to the event? Well, Burning Man also professes to be an experiment in “radical self-reliance,” which “encourages the individual to discover, exercise and rely on his or her inner resources.”

That concept apparently appeals to the anti-government crusader in Norquist. (He’s famous for advocating cutting the federal establishment “down to the size where we can drown it in the bathtub.”)

“There's no government that organizes this," he told NJ. "That's what happens when nobody tells you what to do. You just figure it out. So Burning Man is a refutation of the argument that the state has a place in nature."

But is it?

Not really, argues Tom Berman at Vice ...

What We Talk About When We Talk About the VA

This week, GovExec’s sister publication, Defense One, co-hosted a symposium on veterans issues with Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America. The timing couldn’t have been better: the day after House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, R-Fla., reached a deal with his Senate counterpart, Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., on VA reform legislation, Miller appeared at the event to make the case for a long-range effort to overhaul the Veterans Affairs Department.

Outsiders, too, showed their support for veterans. Longtime broadcast journalist Soledad O’Brien screened The War Comes Home, a documentary on vets struggling with post-tramautic stress, that is scheduled to run on CNN Aug. 12.

TV personality and actor Montel Williams, a veteran himself, gave a mesmerizing address at which he drew an enthusiastic reaction both from attendees and an even larger audience on Twitter to his attacks on congressional inaction and indignation that VA employees would continue to be eligible to receive bonuses under the reform legislation.

Watch Williams’ remarks:

As I sat watching the event, I tweeted about Williams impassioned call for a “surge” in federal efforts to provide care for veterans. It quickly drew dozens of retweets:

She Never Stopped Working to Make Government Better

Sometimes in life, you’re lucky enough to encounter people who are willing to take the time to help you learn how to do your job better. For a journalist, that means finding someone who guides you through complex subjects until you reach at least a minimal level of understanding of key issues.

For me, one such person was Rosslyn S. Kleeman, or as she was known by all whose lives she touched, Roz. She died on July 18 at the age of 92.

Roz had a long and distinguished career in public service, including stints as deputy director of the Women’s Action Program at the Department of Health, Education and Welfare; project director at the Office of Management and Budget; director of federal workforce future issues at the General Accounting Office; and distinguished executive in residence at The George Washington University’s School of Public Policy and Public Administration. For years after her retirement, Roz was active in the National Academy of Public Administration and chaired the Coalition for Effective Change.

She was, in short, at the center of the good government movement for decades.

“So many people greatly admired Roz for her devotion to effective government, accountable ...