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Government Executive Editor in Chief Tom Shoop, along with other editors and staff correspondents, look at the federal bureaucracy from the outside in.
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The Fiscal Cliff and Federal Agencies, Explained

Tuesday morning, on C-SPAN's Washington Journal, Government Executive senior correspondent Charlie Clark took up the subject of the fiscal cliff and the looming federal budget sequester, discussing the potential impact on federal operations. The potential budget cuts could bring widespread furloughs and cuts in key government services.

Watch the full video below:

Air Force Bans Racy Photos in Workplace

Air Force leaders have decided that it's about time to make sexy pinup photos a thing of the past.

Air Force Times reports that Chief of Staff Gen. Mark Welsh has ordered a search of all workplaces and public spaces to root out items such as calendars, posters, and briefing slides that depict scantily clad women. Active, reserve and Air National Guard organizations must report the results of their workplace inspections by Dec. 17. 

The searches will not involve looking into personal computers or property. 

The move comes as the military services are struggling to deal with widespread sexual assaults, including a scandal at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas, in which 31 women were identified earlier this year as victims of sexual misconduct and assault. The Air Force has projected it will receive 700 reports of sexual assault this year. 

“In my view, all this stuff is connected," Welsh told Air Force Times. "If we’re going to get serious about things like sexual assault, we have to get serious about an environment that could lead to sexual harassment. In some ways this stuff can all be linked. I’m not saying every case is linked, but it could ...

That Still-Handy World Almanac

Despite the mountains of data readily available online, information on government and federal agencies is still printed -- and conveniently organized -- between the glossy paper covers of the World Almanac and Book of Facts.

Amazingly this year, the 2013 edition was out and in readers’ hands before the end of November with full results of the Nov. 7 elections.

Of course, there’s the usual year in pictures, profiles of nations, sports feats, economic statistics, historical facts and biographies.

But for anyone who follows the work of agencies, there might be no other single, compact source that gives a squib for each department, with missions, sub-agencies, mailing addresses, websites and budgets. You can also find a list of all previous secretaries of Agriculture; Commerce; Defense; Energy; Homeland Security; the old Health, Education and Welfare Department (since split and renamed Health and Human Services and Education); Housing and Urban Development; Interior; Justice; Labor; State; Transportation; Treasury; and Veterans Affairs.

Online, such info would be widely scattered.