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Government Executive Editor in Chief Tom Shoop, along with other editors and staff correspondents, look at the federal bureaucracy from the outside in.
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Is Pentagon’s ‘Security Cooperation’ Office Too Cooperative With Israel?

A recent Wall Street Journal front-pager with a provocative headline “Israel Outflanks White House” threw limelight on a little known office within the Pentagon.

With combat raging in Gaza between Hamas and Israeli troops, the newspaper reported complaints from the State Department and the White House that the Pentagon was bypassing them in rushing arms to the embattled U.S. ally at a time when Secretary of State John Kerry was hoping to use the missiles and ammunition as leverage in seeking a ceasefire.

“The Pentagon's Defense Security Cooperation Agency, or DSCA, was about to release an initial batch of the Hellfires, according to Israeli and congressional officials,” the Jerusalem-based reporter wrote. “It was immediately put on hold by the Pentagon, and top officials at the White House instructed the DSCA, the U.S. military's European Command and other agencies to consult with policy makers at the White House and the State Department before approving any additional requests.”

The Defense Security Cooperation Agency, run by Vice Adm. Joseph Rixey, is tasked, according to its mission statement, to “lead, resource, and educate the Defense Security Cooperation community to shape, refine, and execute innovative security solutions for partners in support ...

10 Insane Things the Pentagon Gave to Local Law Enforcement

The Department of Defense Excess Property Program (1033) has seen a lot of criticism lately, as news surfaces about how local police departments are using the Pentagon's extras. Pentagon equipment used by the St. Louis County Police in Ferguson, Missouri -- the scene of riots following the shooting of Michael Brown -- includes multiple $47,000 trucks and scores of military rifles. The New York Times highlighted the program and produced an interactive graphic to show the flow of weapons from Defense to police. According to the Times, the program started as a countermeasure to high crime in the 1990s.

Using data obtained under the Freedom of Information Act and covering 2006-2014, we looked into the type and cost of equipment that local law enforcement has been receiving from the Pentagon. Items ranged from aircraft (some costing over $5 million each) to screws and washers (36 cents each). Most of the equipment filtering down to local law enforcement will not surprise the average citizen -- mostly rifles, handguns and related equipment -- but we found a lot of questionable line items.

1. 240 pair of "DRAWERS,EXTREME COLD WEATHER" for a total cost of $1,770.65. San Diego County, California.


La Jolla ...

'Curiosity' Leads Man to Steal Federal Explosives During a Camping Trip

Theft of federal property isn't always the most logical practice, but a man in Wyoming took the act to a new high (low?) last year when he stole more than 500 pounds of Forest Service explosives while camping.

Budd James Nesius, 33, pleaded guilty to charges of possession of stolen explosives in federal court last week. “I guess curiosity got the best of me, and I took it way too far,” Nesius said in court.

In April 2013, Nesius was out with friends on a camping trip and happened upon a bunker on Forest Service property. According to The Casper Star-Tribune, the area is marked by signs noting the explosives in the bunker.

These signs apparently gave Nesius an idea.

Nesius told his friend he intended to steal the explosives. He returned later with bolt cutters, cut the locks and loaded 10 boxes of explosives and 3,936 feet of detonation cord into the back of his truck, [Assistant U.S. Attorney Bryan] Whittaker said.

According to court records, prosecutors said Nesius kept the explosives in a travel trailer for weeks and tried, unsuccessfully, to sell them. As soon as the Forest Service discovered the explosives were missing, another ...

Comparing the Watergate Gang With Lois Lerner

Veteran Washington chronicler Elizabeth Drew, who’s been promoting the re-release of her 1970s New Yorker magazine Watergate articles to mark the 40th anniversary of the Nixon resignation, is eager to draw contrasts with the drama in today’s polarized government.

Speaking Tuesday night at the Arlington County Central Library, the essayist and television commentator warned the crowd of some 130 that she would weigh in on the current controversy over alleged political bias at the Internal Revenue Service. “I expect some tweets on this,” said the alumnae of Congressional Quarterly now writing mostly for the New York Review of Books.

Drew’s new volume, “Washington Journal,” collects the best of her detailed weekly reports on the nation’s most famous political scandal and adds a new afterword on Richard Nixon’s life after he helicoptered away for the last time from the White House lawn.

Most of her talk dealt with the illegal burglaries and co-opting of agency machinery conducted “under the aegis” of Nixon, who, as demonstrated in his secretly taped Oval Office conversations, was often drunk when he delivered “strange” orders designed to retaliate against many perceived enemies.

But the “scary” constitutional crisis over impeachment in ...

Does Obama Have ‘Zero Control’ Over the Bureaucracy?

Last week, in Rolling Stone, Reid Cherlin, a former spokesman for President Obama, explored the reasons for the president’s uncomfortable, adversarial relationship with the media. In the process, he illuminated an ongoing issue for the administration: Even in Obama’s second term, it’s clear that he and his team are having a difficult time making the transition from campaigning to governing -- and in some ways they appear to have all but given up hope on effectively managing government.

Cherlin recalled the wisdom of a veteran staffer on the first campaign he worked on: “Just remember, your worst day on the campaign is better than your best day in the White House." That, said Cherlin, turned out to be not much of an exaggeration.

“The president is nominally in charge of so much that it often feels like the power dynamic inverts, and that the White House exists to take blame for the misdeeds of others -- very often agencies or bureaucrats over which you have essentially zero control,” Cherlin wrote.

“Zero control”? It’s true that the federal government is a massive, incredibly complex enterprise that extends into myriad aspects of Americans’ lives. But a president has much more ...