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To Be More Productive at Work, Put a Plant on Your Desk

The quest to design the perfect office space—a working environment that boosts employee well-being and maximizes productivity—is never-ending. Some swap cubicles for open layouts. Others ditch chairs in favor of standing desks. Now, thanks to research showing a link between plants and productivity, offices might be about to get greener.

A new paper published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology asserts that “investing in landscaping the office with plants will pay off through an increase in office workers’ quality of life and productivity.” Researchers in the UK and the Netherlands noticed that large commercial workplaces in Europe were becoming increasingly sparse, or “lean,” designed according to the principle that minimalism helps workers focus. In response to what they thought was a misguided trend, the researchers conducted a series of studies over 18 months to show that having plants in offices made working conditions better, based on both objective measures of productivity and subjective measures such as perceived air quality, self-reported concentration, and individual employee satisfaction.

In the studies, offices were made greener with installations of leafy plants that were, on average, 90 centimeters (about 3 feet) tall—with one plant for every square meter of office space. “What ...

​To RIF or Not to RIF

Reduction in force is a term that frightens most federal workers. It means uncertainty, potential loss of a job, disruption, and usually more questions than answers. Politicians (even the ones who want to shrink the federal government) oppose them. So do managers, unions, and most people who write about government issues. Most agencies have been “successful” in recent years in avoiding RIFs. They have used attrition, hiring slowdowns and buyouts to reduce their workforce without resorting to a RIF. Most people will tell you a RIF is something to be avoided at all costs.

During my federal career I developed an early understanding of the RIF process when I faced a reduction in force in my first federal job. I immersed myself in the subject when I had to conduct several RIFs over the next 30 years. The last large scale RIF I conducted abolished 700 occupied jobs in a Navy command of 3,200 employees. With that background, I should join the chorus that says RIFs are always bad and attrition is always better. The problem is that it is just not true. Sometimes the alternatives are worse. In fact, sometimes the alternatives do much more damage and disrupt ...

People With an Inflated View of Themselves Get Others to Believe It, Too

In a meritocracy, talent is supposed to rise to the top. That way, important positions like political and executive offices can be filled by those best-equipped to do the job.

But when it comes to sizing up others’ abilities, a new study says we pay more attention to confidence than competence. People with an inflated view of their own abilities are judged by others to be more capable; conversely, people with low confidence are thought to be less capable.

In the study, which was published Aug. 27 in PLOS ONE, university students predicted their own performance and the performance of their classmates in a small tutorial. Students who ranked themselves higher than their actual results—the overconfident students—were also overrated by their peers. Students who underrated themselves were similarly given lower-than-achieved rankings by their peers. These results were consistent whether the predictions were made at the beginning of the term or at the end, when students had ostensibly become more familiar with one another’s work.

“These findings suggest that people don’t always reward the most accomplished individual but rather the most self-deceived,” said Vivek Nityananda, one of the study authors.

There implications span across the workforce. Overconfident ...

Unlocking Federal Talent

The Office of Personnel Management has released a new data tool to the agencies called UnlockTalent.gov. I am excited about this powerful new interactive dashboard because I think it will help federal leaders foster a culture of excellence and high performance at each and every agency.

With UnlockTalent.gov, agency leaders can take advantage of the valuable information from the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey and other HR resources, including Enterprise Human Resources Integration data. It will help them better understand the data and it will give them the extra support they need to create the most effective engagement programs for their employees.

The dashboard is exciting for another reason. It is one of the many ways we are working to meet the President’s Second Term Management Agenda goal of creating a culture of excellence and engagement, leading to higher performance.

There are some great features available as a part of the dashboard that makes it particularly helpful and unique. It is customized to each individual agency’s data with personalized pages. And when users sign in, they have access to five separate tabs: Agency Overview, HR Core Metrics, Employee Engagement, Global Satisfaction, and Community of Practice. Each tab ...

In Performance Reviews, Women are Criticized for Personality Rather Than Performance

There are countless explanations for the extreme paucity of women in the top ranks of companies, in technology and beyond. A study of performance reviews by linguist and Amazon executive Kieran Snyder for Fortune reveals that even in strongly positive reviews, women are much more likely to receive critical feedback. And the feedback is often about their personality, instead of the quality of their work to a truly disproportionate degree.

The reviews shared with Snyder by professionals were generally good, as they were provided voluntarily. But women’s reviews were much more likely to include critical wording:

The criticism was much more likely to include negative personality criticism, to give advice to be less assertive or bossy, and to include words like “abrasive”:

“Abrasive” was used 17 times to describe 13 different women. “Bossy,” “strident,” and “aggressive” make their appearance, and behavior is described as emotional and irrational. The word “aggressive” showed up three times in men’s reviews, but was listed as a positive in two of those instances. The gender of the manager giving the review didn’t make a difference.

Here’s an example of the kind of “constructive” feedback that a woman received in the sample ...