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Scott Eblin offers his take on lessons in the news and his advice on your pressing leadership questions.
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Three Ways to Avoid a Wipeout

In 15 years of coaching, I’ve worked with a lot of high-performing executives. When things go well, they run like a finely tuned Formula 1 race car. But life and humans being what they are, I’ve witnessed the occasional wipeout where, in spite of best efforts and intentions, an exec spins out and crashes into the wall.

In the interest of helping you avoid a similar fate, I’d like to share three best practices that are common to the high performers I work with who run at a really high speed yet avoid wiping out.

Understand what “pacing yourself” means: I hear a lot of executives talk about the need to pace themselves. Often, though, there is more talk than action about setting a sustainable pace until they really understand what “pacing yourself” means. Let’s start with what it doesn’t mean. Pacing yourself is not running with the throttle wide open for weeks or months on end and then taking a weekend off. The problem with that approach is you’re highly likely to wipe out in terms of your performance or health before you get to the break.

What pacing yourself really means is...

A Life-Changing Decision to Feel and Perform Better

What if there were an inexpensive pill with no side effects that would cure many of your aches and pains, spark weight loss, give you more energy, leave you in a better mood, increase your mental focus, help you get more done and extend and improve your life? You’d line up for that, right? So, first the bad news and then the good news. The bad news is, to my knowledge, there is no such pill. The good news is you can get all of those outcomes without ingesting anything new. It’s the opposite, actually. You just need to stop ingesting added sugar in what you eat or drink.

Of course, the “just” in that last sentence is a loaded word. As cited on a new website, SugarScience.org developed by health scientists at the University of California at San Francisco, added sugar is found in 74% of packaged foods and the average American consumes 66 pounds of added sugar each year. Sugar is hidden in a lot of the things that most Americans eat.  There are at least 61 different names for sugar listed on food and beverage labels. And, as you know if you’ve ever...

Your Weekly Perspective Check

Last year, I spent some time talking with the colleagues for a new senior executive I was coaching. The point of the conversations was to incorporate their perspective into the coaching agenda for my client.

The good news was that he appeared to be off to a strong start in his new role. Like a lot of new senior leaders, he was all in on doing a great job. That was appreciated by all but some of his colleagues shared a concern that he not go so all in that his health and other priorities in his life suffered. They cared about this guy personally and believed he would be more effective professionally if he kept his perspective.

One of his direct reports shared a personal story with me that illustrated his point about the importance of regular perspective checks. A few months earlier, he had accompanied his girlfriend to the emergency room when she had stomach pains. (It turned out to be appendicitis and she got the care she needed.) While they were waiting for the doctor to arrive at the examining room, the executive caught a glimpse of an empty room across the hall. As he described it...

Two Simple Ways to Be More Mindful This Year

I’m always looking for great examples of simple things that any of us can do to be more mindful – aware and intentional – about how we approach work and the rest of life. Last week, I heard two great ones from my friend and colleague, Jeff Smith of Voltage Leadership Consulting. Jeff is a former financial services executive, runs a very successful business and is a member of our Conduit program for coaches and our Life GPS certification program. With his permission, I’m sharing with you what he’s been doing that’s working.

We were talking about 2016 goals in our monthly Conduit call last Friday and Jeff shared that his goal for this year is to be more mindful in day to day life. The cool thing about Jeff’s goal is he’s already implementing simple but effective ways to follow through on his goal.

The first is to show up five minutes early. Like so many of us with racked and stacked calendars and to-do lists, Jeff found himself getting to meetings and calls with zero margin for error in terms of being on-time. That left him with no space or bandwidth to start his...

How to Perform Your Best in 2016

As I write this, today is the first full-on work day of the new year for many people. Most of us have hopes and dreams for how the year will go and what we’ll accomplish. Many of us have a long list of goals. Personal improvement, better health, professional accomplishments, stronger relationships, big projects, financial goals – any or all of those and others could be on your list. The lists can be so long they can be overwhelming.

What difference would it make if you could boil all of that down to one simple and memorable goal? What if your primary goal this year was to perform at your best more often than not? What difference would that make? What would that even look like?

That’s what I’ve been working on for the past several years. It’s one of those “It’s about the journey, not the destination,” kind of endeavors. There are days and moments when I hit the target and there are plenty of times when I don’t. But I’ve found that by keeping that primary goal of performing at my best front and center, I’m learning a lot about myself...