Author Archive

Sarah Zhang

Staff Writer

Sarah Zhang is a staff writer at The Atlantic.
Sarah Zhang is a staff writer at The Atlantic.
Management

Omicron Is Pushing America Into Soft Lockdown

Nobody wants to mandate business closures, but so many people are getting sick that businesses are closing anyway.

Management

We Know Enough About Omicron to Know That We’re in Trouble

More data will soon be coming in. But how much do they really matter?

Management

The Pandemic’s Next Turn Hinges on Three Unknowns

A potential winter surge is up to vaccines, variants, and us.

Management

America Has Lost the Plot on COVID

We’re avoiding the hardest questions about living with the coronavirus long term.

Tech

The Plan to Stop Every Respiratory Virus at Once

The benefits of ventilation reach far beyond the coronavirus. What if we stop taking colds and flus for granted, too?

Management

Which Company Will Test the DNA of Separated Families?

And other unanswered questions about the HHS’s new plan to reunite migrants separated at the border.

Defense

1990s Law Limits CDC's Ability to Research Gun Violence As a Public Health Issue

Law was intended to prevent gun control advocacy, but has ended up preventing the agency from studying gun-related deaths.

Management

Grand Canyon National Park Gives In to Creationist Suing for Religious Discrimination

The park will now allow Andrew Snelling, a young-Earth creationist geologist, to collect rocks for research.

Oversight

What to Make of the Tunnel Collapse at a Nuclear Cleanup Site

The incident is only part of the slow-motion deterioration of one of the country's most contaminated places.

Management

All the Ways Trump’s Budget Cuts Science Funding

From the EPA, to the NIH, and NASA, research is not a priority in the administration’s fiscal blueprint.

Management

America's Nuclear-Waste Plan Is a Giant Mess

An explosion caused by cat litter at a storage site was just the beginning.

Management

In Cold Offices, It's All About Your Feet

At Berkeley, researchers are studying how wearing flip-flops changes buildings' air-conditioning needs.