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Charles S. Clark

Senior Correspondent Charles S. Clark joined Government Executive in the fall of 2009. He has been on staff at The Washington Post, Congressional Quarterly, National Journal, Time-Life Books, Tax Analysts, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, and the National Center on Education and the Economy. He has written or edited online news, daily news stories, long features, wire copy, magazines, books, and organizational media strategies.
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Transportation Department Defends Secretary on Ethics Accusation

May 7, 2018 The Transportation Department is defending Secretary Elaine Chao from suggestions that she may have used her office to aid her extended family’s shipping business. As reported over the weekend by Politico, Chao—a Chinese-American whose Taiwanese father is CEO of a New York City-based shipping company focused on Asia—has been appearing...

State Department Clashed With USAID Over Redesign

May 7, 2018 While the Trump administration continues to delay the promised release of last year’s agency-submitted reorganization plans, the inspector general for the U.S. Agency for International Development has offered a detailed portrait of how the “redesign” process unfolded at both USAID and the State Department. USAID and State staffers clashed over...

Twenty-Seven Standout Agency Employees Named as SAMMIES Finalists

May 6, 2018 Federal employees who tracked terrorists, thwarted gangs, distributed emergency famine relief and digitized tools for veterans to collect benefits made the cut of 27 finalists for the annual SAMMIE Awards, the nonprofit Partnership for Public Service announced on Sunday night. Grouped in areas ranging from national security to management to...

Judge Sends GSA FOIA Staff Back to Work on Trump Hotel Docs

May 4, 2018 In the latest zig-zag in the legal battle over President Trump’s profiting from his lease of his Washington luxury hotel, a federal district judge on Thursday faulted the General Services Administration for inadequately responding to a Freedom of Information Act request. Judge Beryl Howell, chief of the U.S. District Court...

Social Security Plan to Shutter Field Office Prompts Street Protest

May 3, 2018 The Trump administration’s bid to streamline agency operations bumped up against the human factor on Thursday as the Social Security Administration’s quiet plan to close a suburban Washington field office provoked a demonstration. Some 60-70 mostly union protesters gathered in front of the Social Security Office in Arlington, Va., chanting...

Energy Dept. CFO Faulted for Risking Violations of Anti-Deficiency Act

May 2, 2018 A probe of Energy Department finances that sometimes got testy led the agency’s inspector general last week to fault the chief financial officer for being dismissive of reports that one program might have violated the Anti-Deficiency Act to the tune of $16 million. The April 26 report from acting watchdog...

FCC Member Violated Hatch Act, Special Counsel Finds

May 2, 2018 A Republican member of the Federal Communications Commission appointed by President Obama violated the Hatch Act while speaking at a conservative political gathering last February, the Office of Special Counsel determined. Commissioner Michael O’Rielly “advocated for the reelection of President Trump in his official capacity as FCC commissioner,” wrote Erica...

U.S. Progress in Rebuilding Afghanistan Detectable Amid Tragedy

May 1, 2018 Despite continued deadly bombings, official corruption and stalled economic development, the 17-year-old U.S. effort to rebuild war-torn Afghanistan has “helped set the stage for progress,” a watchdog reported amid a grim litany of negative indicators. “The U.S. experience in providing support for private-sector development in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2017...

New CDC Chief Takes Pay Cut After Senator's Complaint

May 1, 2018 After five weeks on the job, Centers for Disease Control Director Dr. Robert Redfield agreed to a pay cut, the Health and Human Services Department confirmed. The former University of Maryland AIDS research standout appointed by President Trump was paid $375,000 under a special hiring authority, far more than the...

Merit Board Judge Reinstates Commerce Scientist Accused of Spying

April 30, 2018 A government scientist accused of spying for China won reinstatement to her job as a Commerce Department hydrologist last week. The decision by an administrative judge at the Merit Systems Protection Board in the widely reported case of Sherry Chen was cheered by lawmakers in the Congressional Asian Pacific American...