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Why All the Fuss About Capital Assets?

May 1, 1997 alaurent@govexec.com purred by the National Performance Review, the Office of Management and Budget began taking a closer look at capital assets in 1994, with a bulletin (94-08) designed to help agencies improve the way they buy big items. The budget office recognized that pressure to downsize and restructure was tempting...

Show Me the Money

May 1, 1997 alaurent@govexec.com ull, up-front funding of capital assets helps avoid some of the risks of incremental funding: poor risk management, weak planning, lack of full justification, higher costs, cancellations, loss of sunk costs and inadequate funding to maintain and operate assets, according to the General Accounting Office. Up-front funding also enables...

Meaningful Numbers

May 1, 1997 alaurent@govexec.com n its draft "Capital Programming Guide," the Office of Management and Budget recommends program managers require contractors to measure their progress using earned value rather than traditional spending comparisons. Earned value answers the question, "How are we doing?" at any point in a project by comparing scheduling and cost...

Cover Your Assets

May 1, 1997 ast year, a federal agency asked the Office of Management and Budget to approve funding for a computer system upgrade. Why? So the system would be state of the art, the agency said. Unsatisfied with that answer, OMB resource managers pressed the agency to explain why it needed a state...

Where Performance Counts

April 1, 1997 ere are some types of work for which performance-based contracts already exist. You can find a variety of model performance based work statements through the World Wide Web toolbox for this story here on Government Executive's web site. Guard Services Telephone Hot Line Services Telecommunications Computer Maintenance Product Design Hospital...

Buying Smarts

April 1, 1997 rocurement offices once were known as the black boxes of government: Managers' requests for goods and services went in, but they didn't come out-at least not for a very long time. Now it's time for managers to start thinking outside the black box. Acquisition reform is transforming relations between program...

Where Performance Counts

April 1, 1997 ere are some types of work for which performance-based contracts already exist. You can find a variety of model performance based work statements through the World Wide Web toolbox for this story here on Government Executive's web site. Guard Services Telephone Hot Line Services Telecommunications Computer Maintenance Product Design Hospital...

Past Performance Primer

April 1, 1997 rogram managers, procurement officials and the end users of products and services all have responsibilities in rating contractors' past performance. The contracting office, the technical office and the end users of a product or service all must be involved in evaluating a contractor's performance during and after the contract. These...

Acquisition Reforms at A Glance

April 1, 1997 ext time you need to purchase services or products, check this list before you contact the contracting office. Make sure you know the fastest and easiest ways to buy. Commercial Items The government now prefers to buy on the commercial market the same goods and services used by the general...

Performance Boosters

April 1, 1997 nder acquisition reform, program people are expected to team with contracting employees to plan better buys, do market research, rate past performance and develop performance-based statements of work describing what is to be done rather than how to do it. Here are some pointers for crafting performance-based work statements. Do:...