Promising Practices Promising PracticesPromising Practices
A forum for government's best ideas and most innovative leaders.

Hurricane Sandy Threatens East Coast—How to Prepare

ARCHIVES
NOAA

Before I wrote the Promising Practices blog here at Government Executive, I worked with the federal government on emergency preparedness issues. So when FEMA sends guidance on how you can prepare for a potentially hazardous situation, I tend to listen—and feel obligated to pass that advice along.

Forecasts from the National Hurricane Center and the National Weather Service say Hurricane Sandy will bring intensifying winds over Florida and spread north to the Outer Banks of North Carolina and Virginia Beach through Saturday.

As we saw last year with Hurricane Irene, the East Coast isn’t immune to hurricanes (or earthquakes, we're finding). Experts say one of three scenarios may play out with Hurricane Sandy—it misses the eastern seaboard entirely, brushes by or  slams directly into the region early next week (happy Halloween!).

“A direct-hit scenario would have ‘huge implications’ in New England," FEMA said in a statement. "Even if Sandy only makes a ‘close pass’ it will likely be impactful to the New England region with strong winds that would topple trees causing widespread power outages, storm surge, and coastal flooding.”

FEMA advises the following:

If you have not done so already, it is important to ensure you:

  • Check your family’s emergency supply kit – make certain you have food, water, medications, and other necessities to sustain you, your family and family pets for at least 72 hours.
  • Follow the direction of local officials –evacuation orders may be issued by officials, so follow their guidance. When it comes to swimming, follow local warnings as well. Even the best swimmers can fall victim to the strong waves and rip currents caused by storms.
  • Keep up to date with local conditions – follow TV and radio reports from your area, or visit www.weather.gov (http://mobile.weather.gov on your phone) for the latest forecast.
  • Remember food safety – power outages and flooding may happen as a result of a tropical storm or hurricane, so have a plan for keeping food safe. Have a cooler on hand to keep food cold, and group food together in the freezer so it stays cold longer.
  • Have an adequate communication plan - be sure friends and family know how to contact you. Teach family members how to use text messaging as text messages can often get around network disruptions when a phone call can’t get through.

Hurricane Smartphone Apps:

Latest Sandy information and forecasts from the National Hurricane Center

Community preparedness tools and resources

Do you have any advice on Hurricane preparedness worth sharing? 

Mark Micheli is Special Projects Editor for Government Executive Media Group. He's the editor of Excellence in Government Online and contributes to GovExec, NextGov and Defense One. Previously, he worked on national security and emergency management issues with the US Treasury Department and the Department of Homeland Security. He's a graduate of the Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs and studied at Drake University.

FROM OUR SPONSORS
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Close [ x ] More from GovExec
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from GovExec.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • Sponsored by G Suite

    Cross-Agency Teamwork, Anytime and Anywhere

    Dan McCrae, director of IT service delivery division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    Download
  • Data-Centric Security vs. Database-Level Security

    Database-level encryption had its origins in the 1990s and early 2000s in response to very basic risks which largely revolved around the theft of servers, backup tapes and other physical-layer assets. As noted in Verizon’s 2014, Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR)1, threats today are far more advanced and dangerous.

    Download
  • Federal IT Applications: Assessing Government's Core Drivers

    In order to better understand the current state of external and internal-facing agency workplace applications, Government Business Council (GBC) and Riverbed undertook an in-depth research study of federal employees. Overall, survey findings indicate that federal IT applications still face a gamut of challenges with regard to quality, reliability, and performance management.

    Download
  • PIV- I And Multifactor Authentication: The Best Defense for Federal Government Contractors

    This white paper explores NIST SP 800-171 and why compliance is critical to federal government contractors, especially those that work with the Department of Defense, as well as how leveraging PIV-I credentialing with multifactor authentication can be used as a defense against cyberattacks

    Download
  • Toward A More Innovative Government

    This research study aims to understand how state and local leaders regard their agency’s innovation efforts and what they are doing to overcome the challenges they face in successfully implementing these efforts.

    Download
  • From Volume to Value: UK’s NHS Digital Provides U.S. Healthcare Agencies A Roadmap For Value-Based Payment Models

    The U.S. healthcare industry is rapidly moving away from traditional fee-for-service models and towards value-based purchasing that reimburses physicians for quality of care in place of frequency of care.

    Download
  • GBC Flash Poll: Is Your Agency Safe?

    Federal leaders weigh in on the state of information security

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.