voices

The Best Employees Are Not The Agreeable Ones, According To Adam Grant

Cheerful and helpful workers are beloved by their bosses, and just about everyone else, really. Enthusiastic optimists make for great colleagues, rarely cause problems, and can always be counted on. But they may not necessarily make the best employees, says Adam Grant, the organizational ... Read & React

Government’s technology problems are as complex and difficult to address as any in the world. Agencies need to be able to hire the best. Howard Risher

How a Contractor’s Bid Protest Was a Surprise Boost for Procurement Innovation

by Benjamin McMartin

Late last month, the Government Accountability Office overturned a $950 million contract award to a small Virginia firm to provide cloud services for the Defense Department. The deal was unusual ... Read & React

How To Meditate At Work When There’s No Quiet Place

by Sukey Novogratz and Elizabeth Novogratz

A quiet, private space may be most ideal for meditation, but it is not always an option at the office. What many people don’t realize, though, is that you actually don’t need to be in a quiet space in order to meditate. Learning to meditate in a loud, chaotic space can help you keep your head on ... Read & React

Leaders, Don’t Be the Cheese in the Panini

by Scott Eblin Executive Coach

You can consider this post an update of one I wrote back in the summer of 2009 about how middle managers can feel like the meat in the sandwich. I’ve used that analogy for years with my clients in middle and upper middle management. It really applies to any leader who is not working in the ... Read & React

New Technologies Pose Ethical Challenges for Agencies

Emerging technologies offer agencies many opportunities to enhance services, but what happens when we take humans out of the equation? Some may think that because technology is not human it cannot be ethical. But that’s not the case. While artificial intelligence can vastly expand our access to ... Read & React

Understanding the Rising Rate of Suicide

by Monica H. Swahn Professor, epidemiology and public health, Georgia State University

Suicide rates in the U.S. have increased nearly 30 percent in less than 20 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported June 7. These mind-numbing statistics were released the same week two very famous, successful and beloved people committed suicide – Kate Spade, a tremendous ... Read & React

How To Cry At Work Without The Social Cost

by Kimberly Elsbach Professor of Management, University of California, Davis

While I was working as an engineer at a large food company, I once became frustrated and upset when the meeting leader dismissed a concern I had expressed and, in my mind, put me down for voicing the concern at all. I felt tears in my eyes, but decided to stay in the meeting and try to get my ... Read & React

Why Bosses Cut Some Employees Slack for Unethical Behavior

by Susie Allen

Based on the research of Yajun Zhang, Kai Chi Yam, Maryam Kouchaki and Junwei Zhang. Imagine—or perhaps you don’t have to—that you’re at work and feeling very tired. You’re nearing the deadline on an important project, and you’ve stayed late at the office every day for weeks. Perhaps because ... Read & React

Why Are People So Unproductive in Short Windows of Time?

by Veronique Greenwood

Have you ever decided to take the next hour before you have to go to get something done, and then mysteriously failed to accomplish anything? If so, you're not alone. This phenomenon, when knowing that the available time has a limit keeps you from using it to its fullest, is the subject of a new ... Read & React

The Challenge Effective Leaders Embrace Every Day

I tripped across a simple diagram depicting a continuous loop of learn, adapt, and influence, in a book on negotiation by Michael Wheeler of Harvard Business School, The Art of Negotiation: How to Improvise Agreement in a Chaotic World. While his emphasis was on describing the continually ... Read & React

Government Already Has a Blueprint for Implementing Pay For Performance

by Howard Risher Workforce Management Consultant

Current plans to reorganize agencies and switch to pay for performance have a historical parallel: the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency instituted such a policy change two decades ago. The initiative was a solid success—a direct contrast to the failure to implement the National Security ... Read & React