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Vann R. Newkirk II

Vann R. Newkirk II is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers politics and policy.
Results 21-30 of 42

The Trouble With Medicaid Work Requirements

March 23, 2017 What are work requirements good for? Stretching back to the establishment of welfare in the United States, politicians have debated both the practical and moral utility of requiring people to work in order to receive government benefits. Since welfare reform in the 1990s gave states wide latitude to create work...

How Voter ID Laws Discriminate

February 20, 2017 For all the fervor of the current debate over voter ID laws, there’s a startling lack of good data on their effects. As of the 2016 election, 33 states have a voter identification law, with 12 of those considered “strict” requirements. After the 2013 Shelby County v. Holder Supreme Court...

Why Do Tom Price's Potential Conflicts of Interest Matter?

January 19, 2017 Georgia Representative Tom Price is a wealthy man. A successful orthopedic surgeon in Atlanta before his tenure in the U.S. House, Price amassed a net worth of millions in private practice before entering public service. Since then, he’s managed his wealth via investments in a diverse portfolio. His net worth...

Chelsea Manning, Gen. James Cartwright and Hundreds More Granted Last-Minute Clemency

January 18, 2017 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In the waning hours of his presidency, Barack Obama used his clemency power to commute the prison sentence of Chelsea Manning, a former U.S. Army analyst convicted of espionage in July 2013 by a military court after she turned over a massive cache of defense and diplomatic records, then the...

In the Battle Over Voting Rights, What Happens Next?

December 7, 2016 What happens when an election is declared unlawful? That’s exactly what voters in North Carolina and Wisconsin will soon find out, after courts found multiple congressional and state legislative districts in North Carolina to be racial gerrymanders, and several state legislative districts in Wisconsin to be political ones. The rulings...

California Extends the Ballot to Jails

October 5, 2016 Californians in county jails for felony offenses will be able to vote next year,thanks to a new bill passed by the state legislature and signed by Governor Jerry Brown on Wednesday. The bill—introduced by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, a Democrat—is part of a growing nationwide liberal push against felony disenfranchisement for...

The EPA's Failure to Protect People From the Environment

September 30, 2016 Does the Environmental Protection Agency actually protect communities of color from environmental problems? A new report from the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights suggests it has largely failed that duty: Since being established in 1993 and having nearly 300 Title VI complaints in its docket, EPA’s Office of Civil Rights...

The American Zika Outbreak

September 13, 2016 America is already experiencing a Zika outbreak. The disease has already infected almost 20,000 American citizens and more than 1,500 pregnant women—with some estimates reaching as high as over 10,000 infected pregnant women. There have been dozens of hospitalizations and dozens of cases of the immune disorder Guillain-Barré, including at...

Is There Still Time for Obama to Make Good on His Clemency Promises?

August 18, 2016 Earlier this month, President Obama made history by commuting the sentences of 214 people in federal prisons. That action, one of the largest exercises of presidential clemency powers since Gerald R. Ford granted pardons to Vietnam draft dodgers and deserters facing prison in 1974, has been hailed by the White...

Why Is Aetna Leaving Most of Its Obamacare Exchanges?

August 16, 2016 On Tuesday, Aetna, the insurance giant, announced that it would decamp from Affordable Care Act health exchanges in 11 of 15 states in which it currently operates. Citing a $200 million pre-tax loss in the second quarter of 2016, the company says it will walk away from nearly 70 percent...