AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Tom Shoop

Vice President and Editor in Chief Tom Shoop is vice president and editor in chief at Government Executive Media Group, where he oversees both print and online editorial operations. He started as associate editor of Government Executive magazine in 1989; launched the company’s flagship website, GovExec.com, in 1996; and was named editor in chief in 2007.
Results 3941-3950 of 4061

Uhh, Mr. President?

November 2, 2004 Here's what you get to wake up to tomorrow: The Treasury Department announced Monday that it would have to borrow $147 billion in the first three months of 2005, breaking the borrowing record set in the same time period this year.

The Wrong Stuff.

November 2, 2004 The Denver Post reports that the Homeland Security spending spigot is finally opening, with $12 billion in grants trickling down to local communities, allowing them to purchase high-tech gear like vacuum shovels that suck up debris after explosions. The problem: Many first response organizations lack the personnel to use the...

Faxing Chads.

November 2, 2004 "Now that a new California law allows civilian and military voters overseas to fax their ballots after marking them," the Wall Street Journal reports today, "officials in Yolo County have received two--one from a high-ranking military officer...with complaints about the 'difficulty in punching out holes in the faxed ballot image,'...

More Bad Press for the IRS.

November 2, 2004 Just when the agency got past the story about investigating the NAACP's tax-exempt status, the IRS gets slapped again, this time in an AP story on a report concluding that the rate of corporate audits in the first six months of this year was off last year's pace. The agency...

Caved In.

November 1, 2004 Just when you thought stories about security problems at Los Alamos National Laboratory couldn't get any worse--or weirder--comes news that authorities just discovered that a guy's been living in a cave on the top-secret lab's property for years. And it's not like he was hunkered down in Saddam's rabbit hole,...

Please Let It be Over Soon.

November 1, 2004 You know it's getting bad when the AP puts a story on the wires with this headline: "Dead Voters May Sway Election."

Cutting Starbucks Some Slack.

November 1, 2004 Starbucks' defenders have weighed in about my Oct. 27 item on coffee donations for the troops. Actually, they point out, there are at least a few potential legal hurdles to providing coffee or anything else of value directly to the troops. The better approach, they say, would be for Starbucks...

Unheeded Advice

November 1, 2004 Before the war in Iraq, civil servants offered lots of advice about postwar challenges. Too bad no one was listening. Throughout this summer and early fall, as the situation in Iraq continued to deteriorate and the presidential campaign heated up, Americans were treated to a series of finger-pointing exercises about...

Battle of the Bulge.

October 29, 2004 Oh, I really didn't want to go here. But because it seems we just can't avoid "what were you thinking?" news about politics and the bureaucracy today, check out this story from online magazine Salon about the Bush "bulge" in the first presidential debate that has conspiracy theorists in a...

Bad Timing.

October 29, 2004 It isn't really all that likely that the IRS is engaging in a politically motivated attack on the NAACP by launching an investigation into the group's tax-exempt status. But this is one of those cases where the timing of its actions is guaranteed to raise questions. On Oct. 8, agency...

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