AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Tom Shoop

Vice President and Editor in Chief Tom Shoop is vice president and editor in chief at Government Executive Media Group, where he oversees both print and online editorial operations. He started as associate editor of Government Executive magazine in 1989; launched the company’s flagship website, GovExec.com, in 1996; and was named editor in chief in 2007.
Results 3931-3940 of 3965

Getting the Word Out

September 1, 1999 verybody knows the federal government doesn't get much in the way of positive press coverage. But is the situation entirely the fault of the news media? Mike McCurry, former White House press secretary, doesn't think so. In a recent issue of The Washington Monthly, McCurry argues that "government often falls ...

Fighting Back on the Web

August 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com hen it comes to dealing with unfavorable press coverage, most federal agencies have followed the adage: "Never get into an argument with someone who buys ink by the barrel." Traditionally, agencies' options for responding to stories they believed were unfair or inaccurate were limited: Write a letter to the ...

That's Entertainment

July 1, 1999 hen millions of Americans lined up at theaters this summer to see the long-awaited debut of "Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace," they got what they came for: a swashbuckling sci-fi adventure with stunning visual effects and a dash of mystical philosophy. But they also got something they probably ...

Washington Uncovered

June 1, 1999 s anyone paying attention to the federal bureaucracy? In a recent cover story in American Journalism Review, two veteran journalists argue that major newspapers aren't, to the detriment of readers of across the country. John Herbers, former deputy Washington bureau chief for The New York Times, and James McCartney, a ...

On TV, 'civil servant' means 'bumbling loser'

May 5, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com If you think the image of government employees on television shows just keeps getting worse, you're right, according to a new study. After analyzing more than 1,200 episodes of prime-time series from the 1950s to the 1990s, researchers at the Center for Media and Public Affairs found that every ...

It's a Scandal

May 1, 1999 s the seemingly endless Monica Lewinsky scandal faded away early this year, two groups breathed sighs of relief: White House officials and Washington reporters. Clinton administration leaders had obvious reasons to celebrate the end of the scandal. But reporters were no less thrilled to see the whole sordid affair sputter ...

The Media

April 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com n February, when Rep. Stephen Horn, R-Calif., released the latest in his series of report cards on federal agencies' progress in fixing the year 2000 computer problem, Associated Press reporter Jim Abrams wrote two different stories about the grades within 24 hours. That's not uncommon-wire service reporters routinely file ...

Accentuate the Negative

March 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com kay class, it's time for a pop quiz. First, a little background. Two years ago, the General Accounting Office reported on what it said were "serious weaknesses" in computer security at five Internal Revenue Service facilities. Among other problems, GAO noted, the IRS couldn't account for 6,400 magnetic tapes ...

Hammered Out

February 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com n a recent issue of National Journal, reporter Sydney Freedberg wrote about the phenomenon of the $600 hammer, the icon of Defense Department waste and incompetence that inspired the Hammer Awards Vice President Al Gore hands out to agencies for improving their management practices. References to the ridiculously overpriced ...

Facts and Details

January 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com ight years ago, the Office of Government Ethics, in its infinite wisdom, decided to allow civil servants to let journalists take them to lunch--as long as lunch didn't cost more than $20. The Washington Post, in a tongue-in-cheek Style section piece, asked several prominent writers about the impact of ...