AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Tom Shoop

Vice President and Editor in Chief Tom Shoop is vice president and editor in chief at Government Executive Media Group, where he oversees both print and online editorial operations. He started as associate editor of Government Executive magazine in 1989; launched the company’s flagship website, GovExec.com, in 1996; and was named editor in chief in 2007.
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How Al Gore would govern

January 12, 2000 tshoop@govexec.com A group of panelists showed Tuesday that it's possible to hold a forum on the subject of how Al Gore would govern as President while barely making reference to the effort he has led over the past seven years to reinvent the executive branch of the federal government. A ...

How John McCain would govern

January 10, 2000 tshoop@govexec.com If John McCain were elected President, he would be a hands-on manager who would try to focus federal agencies on areas where government can be most effective, according to panelists at a forum in Washington last week. "He would be the chief of staff, he would be the commander, ...

How Bill Bradley would govern

January 5, 2000 tshoop@govexec.com Would Bill Bradley be the next Jimmy Carter? Several of Bradley's former colleagues in Congress, along with journalists and Bradley's former chief of staff, debated that question at a forum in Washington on Tuesday. Panelists at the forum described Bradley as a bright, detail-oriented, highly effective policy strategist. But ...

Freedom to Speak

December 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com his fall brought a cautionary tale about the relationship between government, its employees, the media and the First Amendment-involving the very magazine you're reading. The story starts in April 1996, when Government Executive published an article called "The Great Divide" about race relations in government and efforts to increase ...

The Pentagon vs. the Press

November 1, 1999 hen it comes to media relations, no federal organization has a bigger challenge than the Pentagon. Even in peacetime, the Defense Department is a huge, secretive, enormously complicated organization. And when America goes to war, the military's decisions about how much and what type of information to release to reporters ...

Summertime Blues

October 1, 1999 f it's October, life in Washington must be returning to normal: endless budget bickering, political gamesmanship, attacks on the bureaucracy and the drone of the seemingly nonstop presidential campaign. All of these are indications that the city has recovered from its annual summer break. Late summer in oppressively hot and ...

Getting the Word Out

September 1, 1999 verybody knows the federal government doesn't get much in the way of positive press coverage. But is the situation entirely the fault of the news media? Mike McCurry, former White House press secretary, doesn't think so. In a recent issue of The Washington Monthly, McCurry argues that "government often falls ...

Fighting Back on the Web

August 1, 1999 tshoop@govexec.com hen it comes to dealing with unfavorable press coverage, most federal agencies have followed the adage: "Never get into an argument with someone who buys ink by the barrel." Traditionally, agencies' options for responding to stories they believed were unfair or inaccurate were limited: Write a letter to the ...

That's Entertainment

July 1, 1999 hen millions of Americans lined up at theaters this summer to see the long-awaited debut of "Star Wars Episode 1: The Phantom Menace," they got what they came for: a swashbuckling sci-fi adventure with stunning visual effects and a dash of mystical philosophy. But they also got something they probably ...

Washington Uncovered

June 1, 1999 s anyone paying attention to the federal bureaucracy? In a recent cover story in American Journalism Review, two veteran journalists argue that major newspapers aren't, to the detriment of readers of across the country. John Herbers, former deputy Washington bureau chief for The New York Times, and James McCartney, a ...