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The Electronic-Medical-Records Email(s) of the Day, No. 2

April 21, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For background on the EMR saga, see this original article and previous installments one, two, three, four, five, six, and seven. Today, let's talk technical and business specifics of electronic-record software. First, from someone in this business, a vivid and specific illustration of the overall distortion of the medical marketplace. ...

The Electronic-Medical-Records Email of the Day, No. 1

April 16, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Background: In last month's issue of The Atlantic (subscribe!) I had a brief Q&A with Dr. David Blumenthal, who had kicked off the Obama Administration's effort to encourage use of electronic medical records. Since then, the mail has kept gushing in, as reported in previous as reported in in our ...

Heartbleed Update: Sites That Tell You Which Passwords You Should Bother to Change

April 11, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For background, see this early Heartbleed dispatch on general principles of password hygiene, and this one on a range of test utilities to check whether possibly affected sites have yet been repaired. Your simple two-point checklist for today and the weekend: 1) In addition to some of the other test ...

How to Check If a Site Is Safe From 'Heartbleed'

April 9, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow This post follows one a few hours ago about the Heartbleed security failure, and for safety's sake it repeats information I have added to that post as an update. Point 1: If you would like to test to see whether a site is exposed to the loophole created (over the ...

Why Doctors Still Use Pen and Paper

April 7, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The health-care system is one of the most technology-dependent parts of the American economy, and one of the most primitive. Every patient knows, and dreads, the first stage of any doctor visit: sitting down with a clipboard and filling out forms by hand. David Blumenthal, a physician and former Harvard ...

When Will Genomics Cure Cancer?

January 2, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Since the beginning of this century, the most rapidly advancing field in the life sciences, and perhaps in human inquiry of any sort, has been genomics. In 2001, rival teams from the Human Genome Project and the private company Celera each announced a draft sequence of the human genome—a map, ...

Why a Precision Strike Won't Work in Syria

August 27, 2013 Please read this article by Chuck Spinney, out today in Counterpunch. (And before you ask: No, I don't agree with everything in Counterpunch, nor every view of Spinney's, nor even everything in the Atlantic. But I do agree with this.) Spinney, whom I have known and respected for his national-security ...

The Government Needs to Stop Overreacting to NSA Leaks

July 30, 2013 This column over the weekend, by the British academic John Naughton in the Guardian, takes us one more step in assessing the damage to American interests in the broadest sense-- commercial, strategic, ideological – from the panopticon approach to "security" brought to us by NSA-style monitoring programs. Naughton's essay doesn't ...

Analysis: Paying the Costs of Iraq, for Decades to Come

March 29, 2013 A little over ten years ago, George W. Bush fired his economic advisor, Lawrence Lindsey, for saying that the total cost of invading Iraq might come to as much as $200 billion. Bush instead stood by such advisors as Paul Wolfowitz, who said that the invasion would be largely "self-financing" ...

Your real-time cyberattack map

October 15, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow I have no idea how reliable the info shown here is, but it certainly is interesting. Especially to me, as I climb onto a plane bound for southern China via Japan. It's an animated real-time visualization of (it says) attempted cyber-attacks. Click below for a more detailed view or on ...