AUTHOR ARCHIVES

David Rohde

David Rohde is an investigative reporter for Reuters, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, and a former reporter for The New York Times. His latest book, Beyond War: Reimagining American Influence in a New Middle East, was published in April. More He is the author, with Kristen Mulvihill, of A Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping From Two Sides.
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America's $28 Billion Failure in Pakistan

12:18 PM ET Since 2001, the United States has tried virtually every strategy available to persuade Pakistan's army to take the threat of militancy more seriously, but 12 years and $28 billion in aid later, all the American approaches are widely viewed as having failed. First, the Bush administration heaped praise on former ...

How the U.S. and Europe Failed James Foley

August 20, 2014 Somewhere in the desert of eastern Syria, a militant from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria beheaded the American journalist James Foley this week. The killer and his terrorist group are responsible for Foley’s death. They should be the focus of public anger. But Foley’s execution is also a ...

The Russian Double Game Continues in Ukraine

July 15, 2014 As fighting intensifies in eastern Ukraine, signs are emerging that Russian President Vladimir Putin has adopted a twin strategy: pledge his willingness to support a negotiated settlement, but continue funneling arms to separatist rebels. "Putin in the last several weeks has been playing a dual game," said Steven Pifer, a ...

The Rise and Fall of Our Man in Baghdad

July 1, 2014 In November 2010, the United States faced a painful dilemma in Iraq. The man Washington had picked from near-obscurity four years earlier to be Iraq's prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, had narrowly lost an election but was, with help from Iran, maneuvering to stay in power. The clock was ticking as ...

Bergdahl and the Impossible Choices Hostages Face

June 8, 2014 The furor surrounding the exchange of five Taliban prisoners for Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl last week has exposed the murky world—and impossible choices—of the families of Americans taken captive by militants. Demands for vast ransoms or for prisoner releases put these families in the excruciating position of seeming to be able ...

How Obama Thinks About Counterterrorism

June 2, 2014 In a foreign-policy address last week, President Obama gave his clearest outline yet of his counterterrorism strategy. Al-Qaeda splinter groups remain the largest threat to the United States, he said, but Washington must respond to it in a new way: by training local security forces, not deploying American ground troops. ...

The Unraveling of Kerry’s Bid for Mideast Peace

April 30, 2014 To both critics and supporters, it was "classic" John Kerry. A day before the formal end of Kerry's quixotic, nine-month effort to broker an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, the secretary of state was surreptitiously taped making a comment that provoked a political firestorm in Washington. In a closed meeting with foreign-policy ...

How America Lost Russia

April 20, 2014 In September 2001, as the U.S. reeled from the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, Vladimir Putin supported Washington's imminent invasion of Afghanistan in ways that would have been inconceivable during the Cold War. He agreed that U.S. planes carrying humanitarian aid could fly through Russian ...

Afghan Election Was a 'Real Defeat' to the Taliban

April 9, 2014 In a nation more associated with calamity than consensus, the initial results of Saturday's Afghan presidential election are startling. Despite Taliban threats to attack polling stations nationwide, the same percentage of Afghans turned out to vote—roughly 58 percent, or 7 million out of 12 million eligible voters—as did Americans in ...

Can the U.S. Still Confront Autocrats?

April 1, 2014 A quarter-century after the fall of the Soviet Union, authoritarian rulers such as Vladimir Putin and Bashar al-Assad are showing they can and will defy international norms, suppress dissent, and use military force. American policymakers are struggling with how to respond. "It's a big philosophical question about how to deal ...