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Bruce Schneier

Bruce Schneier is a correspondent for The Atlantic. He writes about security and technology. His latest book is Liars and Outliers: Enabling the Trust That Society Needs to Thrive.
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Just Wait Until Data Thieves Start Releasing Altered and Fake Emails

September 15, 2016 In the past few years, the devastating effects of hackers breaking into an organization's network, stealing confidential data, and publishing everything have been made clear. It happened to the Democratic National Committee, to Sony, to the National Security Agency, to the cyber-arms weapons manufacturer Hacking Team, to the online adultery...

How Long Until Hackers Start Faking Leaked Documents?

September 14, 2016 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In the past few years, the devastating effects of hackers breaking into an organization's network, stealing confidential data, and publishing everything have been made clear. It happened to the Democratic National Committee, to Sony, to the National Security Agency, to the cyber-arms weapons manufacturer Hacking Team, to the online adultery...

How the Internet of Things Limits Consumer Choice

December 29, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In theory, the Internet of Things—the connected network of tiny computers inside home appliances, household objects, even clothing—promises to make your life easier and your work more efficient. These computers will communicate with each other and the Internet in homes and public spaces, collecting data about their environment and making...

Lesson From the Ashley Madison Hack: Cloud Makes Everyone Vulnerable

September 9, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Most of us get to be thoroughly relieved that our emails weren't in the Ashley Madison database. But don’t get too comfortable. Whatever secrets you have, even the ones you don’t think of as secret, are more likely than you think to get dumped on the Internet. It's not your...

Why US Officials Stopped Talking about 'Cyberwar'

March 3, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Before the Internet, when surveillance consisted largely of government-on-government espionage, agencies like the NSA would target specific communications circuits: that Soviet undersea cable between Petropavlovsk and Vladivostok, a military communications satellite, a microwave network. This was for the most part passive, requiring large antenna farms in nearby countries. Modern targeted...

What the Future of Government Surveillance Looks Like

March 2, 2015 Before the Internet, when surveillance consisted largely of government-on-government espionage, agencies like the NSA would target specific communications circuits: that Soviet undersea cable between Petropavlovsk and Vladivostok, a military communications satellite, a microwave network. This was for the most part passive, requiring large antenna farms in nearby countries. Modern targeted...

We Still Don't Know Who Hacked Sony

January 5, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow If anything should disturb you about the Sony hacking incidents and subsequent denial-of-service attack against North Korea, it’s that we still don’t know who’s behind any of it. The FBI said in December that North Korea attacked Sony. I and others have serious doubts. There’s countervailing evidence to suggest that...

Did North Korea Really Attack Sony?

December 22, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow I am deeply skeptical of the FBI’s announcement on Friday that North Korea was behind last month’s Sony hack. The agency’s evidence is tenuous, and I have a hard time believing it. But I also have trouble believing that the U.S. government would make the accusation this formally if officials...

Did North Korea Really Attack Sony Pictures?

December 22, 2014 I am deeply skeptical of the FBI’s announcement on Friday that North Korea was behind last month’s Sony hack. The agency’s evidence is tenuous, and I have a hard time believing it. But I also have trouble believing that the U.S. government would make the accusation this formally if officials...

Should U.S. Hackers Fix Cybersecurity Holes or Exploit Them?

May 20, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow There’s a debate going on about whether the U.S. government—specifically, the NSA and United States Cyber Command—should stockpile Internet vulnerabilities or disclose and fix them. It's a complicated problem, and one that starkly illustrates the difficulty of separating attack and defense in cyberspace. A software vulnerability is a programming mistake...

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