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Brendan Sasso

National Journal Brendan Sasso is a technology correspondent for National Journal. He previously covered technology policy issues for The Hill and was a researcher and contributing writer for the 2012 edition of the Almanac of American Politics. He grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and graduated from Claremont McKenna College.
Results 1-10 of 206

Consumers Rant to FCC about Net Neutrality

July 30, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In just the first month that net-neutrality regulations have been in effect, consumers have filed about 2,000 complaints to the Federal Communications Commission against Comcast, AT&T, and other Internet service providers, according to records obtained by National Journal. And the depth of consumer outrage over unreliable Internet service and high...

Feds: App Secretly Hijacked Phones to Mine Digital Money

June 29, 2015 A smartphone app secretly hijacked its users' devices to mine for digital currencies for its developer, federal and state regulators alleged Monday. The process drained batteries and used up mobile data, potentially causing users to incur fees by going over their monthly data limits, the Federal Trade Commission and the...

Feds: App Secretly Hijacked Phones to Mine Digital Money

June 29, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A smartphone app secretly hijacked its users' devices to mine for digital currencies for its developer, federal and state regulators alleged Monday. The process drained batteries and used up mobile data, potentially causing users to incur fees by going over their monthly data limits, the Federal Trade Commission and the...

Feds Urged to Investigate Uber’s Plan to Track Users

June 22, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A privacy advocacy group is urging federal regulators to investigate Uber's planned changes to its privacy policy. The new policy, set to take effect on July 15, would give the ride-hailing service access to users' address books and allow the company to collect location data even when the app is...

FCC Moves to Subsidize Internet as Republicans Warn of 'Tax' Hike

June 19, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Federal Communications Commission moved forward Thursday with an ambitious plan that could help millions of low-income Americans get online. The agency proposed overhauling its Lifeline program, which currently covers only phone service, to subsidize high-speed Internet access. The proposal is a recognition of how critical the Internet is now...

AT&T Faces $100 Million Fine in FCC's First-Ever Net-Neutrality Case

June 18, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Federal Communications Commission plans to fine AT&T $100 million in the agency's first-ever attempt to enforce net-neutrality rules. AT&T misled consumers by limiting "unlimited" data plans, the FCC claimed Wednesday. Under AT&T's "Maximum Bit Rate" policy, it reduces the data speeds of customers paying for unlimited data plans after...

Privacy Groups Boycott Administration's Facial Recognition Talks

June 16, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Obama administration's push to restrict the commercial use of facial recognition technology suffered a severe setback Tuesday when privacy groups walked away in protest. The groups said in a statement that they saw no reason to continue the talks organized by the Commerce Department because the tech industry refused...

Groups Boycott Administration's Facial Recognition Talk

June 16, 2015 The Obama administration's push to restrict the commercial use of facial recognition technology suffered a severe setback Tuesday when privacy groups walked away in protest. The groups said in a statement that they saw no reason to continue the talks organized by the Commerce Department because the tech industry refused...

Does NSA Spying Leave the US Without Moral High Ground in China Hack?

June 15, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow All signs point to China being responsible for one of the worst hacks in U.S. history, exposing sensitive records of millions of federal employees. But the U.S. is an awkward position in deciding how to respond to the humiliating blow. That's partially because in the two years since Edward Snowden's...

Experts: NSA Spying May Leave the U.S. Without Moral High Ground in OPM Hack

June 15, 2015 All signs point to China being responsible for one of the worst hacks in U.S. history, exposing sensitive records of millions of federal employees. But the U.S. is an awkward position in deciding how to respond to the humiliating blow. That's partially because in the two years since Edward Snowden's...