AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Brendan Sasso

National Journal Brendan Sasso is a technology correspondent for National Journal. He previously covered technology policy issues for The Hill and was a researcher and contributing writer for the 2012 edition of the Almanac of American Politics. He grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and graduated from Claremont McKenna College.
Results 1-10 of 187

FCC Prepares to Become the Internet's Privacy Cop

May 22, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Federal Communications Commission is warning Internet providers to get in line as it prepares to enforce new privacy regulations. The agency issued an "enforcement advisory" Wednesday, outlining for the first time how it plans to decide whether to crack down on a company for violating its customers' privacy. But ...

FBI Director Blasts Tech Companies Fighting for Encryption

May 20, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow FBI Director James Comey fired back on Wednesday at Silicon Valley companies that are calling for stronger encryption of their products. "Some prominent folks wrote a letter to the president yesterday that I frankly found depressing," Comey said in a discussion at Georgetown University Law Center, referring to a letter ...

NSA Spying Heads to Critical Senate Showdown

May 14, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The House overwhelmingly approved legislation Wednesday to end the National Security Agency's mass-spying program, setting up a high-stakes showdown next week in the Senate. Key provisions of the Patriot Act are set to expire June 1, and because of a scheduled recess, Congress has only until May 22 to reach ...

NSA Spying Heads to Critical Senate Showdown

May 14, 2015 The House overwhelmingly approved legislation Wednesday to end the National Security Agency's mass-spying program, setting up a high-stakes showdown next week in the Senate. Key provisions of the Patriot Act are set to expire June 1, and because of a scheduled recess, Congress has only until May 22 to reach ...

NSA Spying Heads to Critical Senate Showdown

May 14, 2015 The House overwhelmingly approved legislation Wednesday to end the National Security Agency's mass-spying program, setting up a high-stakes showdown next week in the Senate. Key provisions of the Patriot Act are set to expire June 1, and because of a scheduled recess, Congress has only until May 22 to reach ...

Telecom, Cable Industries File Emergency Motion to Kill Net Neutrality

May 14, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow All of the major telecom and cable industry groups filed an emergency motion Wednesday, asking a federal court to block net neutrality regulations. The rules, which the Federal Communications Commission approved in February, threaten billions of dollars in investments with unjustified, utility-style regulations, the groups wrote in their filing to ...

Verizon's AOL Deal Could Lead to New Privacy Problems

May 13, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Verizon's $4.4 billion purchase of AOL isn't really about obtaining The Huffington Post or AOL's 2.2 million dial-up subscribers. It's about advertising. Industry analysts think the company's goal is to use AOL's technology to deliver more finely targeted video ads. That fits with AOL's recent direction under CEO Tim Armstrong, ...

NSA Officials Lobby Senators as Patriot Act Nears Deadline

May 13, 2015 Top intelligence officials met with senators Tuesday in a classified briefing as key surveillance provisions of the Patriot Act edge closer to expiring. Senators declined to provide any details as they left the secure briefing room in the U.S. Capitol. FBI Director James Comey also refused to answer any questions ...

The 'Privacy Coalition' That Wants to Trim Data Regulations for Telecom Giants

May 12, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The "21st Century Privacy Coalition" might sound like the name of a group fighting for stronger privacy protections in the Internet age. But, in fact, it represents some of the nation's largest cable and phone companies, and is working to help those companies escape regulations on how they have to ...

Does the Patriot Act Justify NSA Surveillance? Law in Uncharted Territory as Deadlines Approaches

May 11, 2015 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Can Congress overrule a court decision without changing a word in the law? That's the question that lawmakers are wrestling with after a federal appeals court ruled last week that a controversial National Security Agency surveillance program is illegal. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit didn't address ...