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Brendan Sasso

National Journal Brendan Sasso is a technology correspondent for National Journal. He previously covered technology policy issues for The Hill and was a researcher and contributing writer for the 2012 edition of the Almanac of American Politics. He grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and graduated from Claremont McKenna College.
Results 1-10 of 130

Consumer Agency Goes After Phone Companies for Bogus Charges

December 18, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The telecom industry has a new cop on its beat. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau sued Sprint on Wednesday for "cramming" consumers' phone bills with bogus third-party charges. The lawsuit demands that Sprint provide tens of millions of dollars in refunds to consumers. It's the first time that CFPB, which ...

FCC Plans Giant Fine of Sprint for Bogus Phone Charges

December 16, 2014 The Federal Communications Commission is preparing to fine Sprint $105 million for overcharging its customers, according to agency officials. The fine would be tied for the largest the FCC has ever imposed on a company. In October, AT&T agreed to pay $105 million over similar allegations. According to the enforcement ...

Tech Giants Join Microsoft's Privacy Fight Against Justice Department

December 15, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Microsoft is getting some reinforcements in its battle with the Justice Department over access to emails stored on servers overseas. Verizon, Apple, Amazon, AT&T, Cisco, eBay, HP, Infor, Salesforce, and Rackspace on Monday all signed on to legal briefs urging a federal appeals court to throw out the Justice Department's ...

FCC Hikes Phone Fees to Give Students Faster Internet

December 11, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Federal Communications Commission voted Thursday to spend an additional $1.5 billion every year to pay for high-speed Internet in schools and libraries. The commission's three Democrats argued that the step will ensure that students have access to the online tools they need to prepare for the jobs of the ...

Three Years After SOPA Crashed and Burned, Congress Seeks Copyright Update

December 11, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Nearly three years after a massive online protest derailed the Stop Online Piracy Act, many lawmakers are still nervous about even uttering the name "SOPA" in public. The bill, which once had broad bipartisan support and was a top priority for the entertainment industry, has become a dirty word. The ...

Internet Sales Tax Bill Quashed For Now

December 4, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A last-ditch push by about 30 Republicans to convince House Speaker John Boehner to allow lame-duck action on an online sales-tax measure failed Wednesday, but those attending the closed meeting said he is promising to revisit the issue early next year. "We had a robust discussion, and everybody knows how ...

Google Alumna Turned USAID Innovator Has Some ‘Crazy’ Ideas to Combat Global Poverty

December 2, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Obama administration is bringing on a Silicon Valley veteran to change the way the United States helps people around the world. The U.S. Agency for International Development has named Ann Mei Chang, a former Google executive, to head the new U.S. Global Development Lab. The mission of the lab, ...

Feds Accuse Sony of Overhyping PlayStation Features

December 1, 2014 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Sony agreed to settle federal charges on Tuesday that it misled customers about features on its PlayStation Vita handheld gaming device. The company has promised to provide refunds of $25 in cash or $50 in merchandise vouchers to customers who bought a Vita before June 1, 2012. Sony will send ...

Feds Accuse Sony of Overhyping PlayStation Features

November 25, 2014 Sony agreed to settle federal charges on Tuesday that it misled customers about features on its PlayStation Vita handheld gaming device. The company has promised to provide refunds of $25 in cash or $50 in merchandise vouchers to customers who bought a Vita before June 1, 2012. Sony will send ...

Last-Minute Pitches for NSA Reform Fail To Gain Consensus

November 25, 2014 Privacy advocates, facing an uphill battle in a Republican-controlled Congress next year, will have to make a difficult choice. Some argue that their best shot to curb the National Security Agency's powers will be to kill core provisions of the USA Patriot Act altogether. But other reformers aren't ready to ...