AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Bob Brewin

Editor at Large Bob Brewin joined Government Executive in April 2007, bringing with him more than 20 years of experience as a journalist focusing on defense issues and technology. Bob covers the world of defense and information technology for Nextgov, and is the author of the “What’s Brewin” blog.
Results 2941-2950 of 3021

Cyber Wars

October 1, 2007 As attackers hack government computer networks across the globe, the Pentagon seeks the best defense. September seemed to mark a serious escalation in global cyber warfare. Media reports detailed what appeared to be Chinese attacks against Pentagon networks and government computer systems in Germany, France and the United Kingdom-putting Defense ...

Wireless broadband systems could be vulnerable to attack

September 20, 2007 Wireless broadband systems planned for global use that use the popular WiMax standard can, "despite good intentions," be jammed, hacked and spoofed, according to a paper published last month by a United Kingdom group of government intelligence experts. The Centre for the Protection of National Infrastructure warned in a paper ...

Defense IG: We're Our Worst Enemy

September 17, 2007 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Defense Department inspector general released a report last week that shows despite releasing over the past year a grand total of 36 investigations and reports on Defense’s managerial shortcomings in information assurance weaknesses, Defense still has real problems with information security basics. Investigations conducted between Aug. 1, 2006, and ...

What's Brewin': Beware of Zombies

September 17, 2007 Attack of the Chinese Zombies The wave of cyberprobes or cyberattacks against Pentagon networks and government computer systems in France, Germany, New Zealand and the United Kingdom this summer appears to emanate from China, but no one in authority in the Defense Department or any of the other countries that ...

The Hidden GPS III Speed Bump

September 12, 2007 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Air Force Space Command’s Space and Missile Systems Center has hit another speed bump in the development of the next-generation Global Positioning System satellites. But to find out, you need to start the day reading, and then deciphering, obscure contract notices on the GSA’s Federal Business Opportunities Web site. ...

White House shifting to Internet-based communications

September 12, 2007 The White House appears ready to join businesses large and small in shifting its communications, including its phone calls, to an Internet-based system, according to a contract notice issued Tuesday by the procurement arm of the Defense Information Systems Agency. The Defense Information Technology Contracting Organization said it intends to ...

The Fully Loaded MRAP II

September 11, 2007 FROM NEXTGOV arrow You typically don’t associate the Space and Naval Warfare System Command with armored vehicles, but it turns out the command’s Space and Naval Systems Center in Charleston, S.C., plays a key role (page 46) in the final assembly of vehicles designed to protect troops in Iraq against Improvised Explosive Devices. ...

Defense launches broad-based RFID procurement

August 31, 2007 The Army this month launched a broad procurement for Radio Frequency Identification hardware, tags and services, but potential bidders expressed disappointment at its value and said it could require development of Defense-specific noncommercial hardware. The contract asks vendors to provide passive RFID hardware, tags and services for the Defense Department, ...

EPA to test use of RFID system to track hazardous waste shipments

August 30, 2007 The Environmental Protection Agency announced plans last week to test the use of Radio Frequency Identification technology to track the shipment of chemicals and hazardous waste from Mexico to disposal facilities in the United States. Hazardous waste generated by Mexican manufacturing plants near the U.S.-Mexico border that use raw materials ...

Keeping B-2 Bomber Off Your TV

August 29, 2007 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In early flight tests, new radar for the Air Force’s B-2 bomber, which was designed to not interfere with commercial satellite television signals, had technical problems, but the Air Force reports it will solve the problems. In 2002, the Air Force and B-2 contractor Northrop Grumman started a $900 million ...