AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Aliya Sternstein

Senior Correspondent Aliya Sternstein reports on cybersecurity and homeland security systems for Nextgov. She has covered technology for nine years at such publications as National Journal's TechnologyDaily, Federal Computer Week and Forbes. Before joining Government Executive, she covered agriculture and derivatives trading for Congressional Quarterly. She has been a guest commentator on C-SPAN, WTOP and Federal News Radio. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.
Results 1691-1700 of 2029

VA nixes troubled tech projects

December 2, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Veterans Affairs Department has ended or cut funding for 15 information technology projects that it temporarily halted this summer, VA officials said on Tuesday night. The department in July announced it had stopped 45 IT projects -- budgeted at about $200 million total -- that were either over cost ...

From Nextgov.com: VA nixes troubled tech projects

December 2, 2009 The Veterans Affairs Department has ended or cut funding for 15 information technology projects that it temporarily halted this summer, VA officials said on Tuesday night. Read the full story on Nextgov.com

Metro IT Money Unspent

December 1, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Washington's Metro system has spent only eight percent of the economic stimulus funds it has budgeted for information technology, according to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. The Recovery Act enacted last February provided the beleaguered transportation system with $10.65 million for hardware and software to improve maintenance, monitor network ...

Casting a Wider Net

December 1, 2009 Making Internet freedom a condition of diplomatic relations proves difficult. To live up to the title of Nobel Peace Prize winner, President Obama must rally foreign governments with questionable human rights records to cooperate on trade pacts, border deals, nuclear disarmament and a host of other diplomatic agreements. The White ...

Could mobile technology have stopped state dinner security breach?

November 30, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A Washington area couple allegedly managed to attend portions of a state dinner without proper clearance.Samantha Appleton/The White House Improved networking of mobile devices could help prevent security gaffes such as the alleged errors that led to an uninvited couple being allowed into the Nov. 24 White House state dinner, ...

From Nextgov.com: Could mobile technology have stopped the state dinner security breach?

November 30, 2009 Improved networking of mobile devices could help prevent security gaffes such as the alleged errors that led to an uninvited couple allowed into the Nov. 24 White House state dinner, say some government technology specialists. Read the full story on Nextgov.com

Open Government Directive?

November 26, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Remember the open government directive - the guidance that President Obama on his first day in office memoed his administration about. He said he wanted recommendations by May 21 for regulations -- to be issued by the Office of Management and Budget -- that would put the principles of transparency, ...

Agencies use technology in effort to unravel Watergate mystery

November 25, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Federal officials are using forensic technology on handwritten notes from a Nixon administration meeting to see if they reveal word indentations that could determine what was contained in the 18 1/2-minute gap in the Watergate tapes. Forensic specialists from several agencies are teaming to determine whether there is any evidence ...

RATB: Independent or an Agency?

November 23, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Officials at the board overseeing stimulus spending and Recovery.gov have stressed to Nextgov that they are part of an independent body, not the White House. Ever since Congress established the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board last winter, officials have said they should not be described in print as White House ...

Better reporting technology an unexpected byproduct of stimulus

November 23, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Technology that states have deployed to report how they spent federal stimulus funds is likely to permanently change information exchange across the public and private sector, despite controversy over figures on the number of jobs created and saved, said New York officials, academics and federal leaders. "Data is always problematic; ...