AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Aliya Sternstein

Senior Correspondent Aliya Sternstein reports on cybersecurity and homeland security systems for Nextgov. She has covered technology for nine years at such publications as National Journal's TechnologyDaily, Federal Computer Week and Forbes. Before joining Government Executive, she covered agriculture and derivatives trading for Congressional Quarterly. She has been a guest commentator on C-SPAN, WTOP and Federal News Radio. She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania.
Results 1691-1700 of 1925

Online tool sheds sunlight on court records

August 19, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A group of academics have unveiled an online tool to make federal courts transparent by providing free public access to court records -- and they are encouraging the White House to help with the effort. The Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton University this month began to unlock the ...

From Nextgov.com: USDA unit bans browsers other than Internet Explorer

August 19, 2009 An Agriculture Department agency has begun enforcing a policy banning the use of Web browsers other than Microsoft's Internet Explorer, to the surprise of employees who rely on other browsers, such as Mozilla's Firefox, to help in developing Web sites for public use. Read the full story on Nextgov.com.

Cloudy Outlook

August 17, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow View charts of top 50 technology contractors for 2000-2009. The impact of Obama IT initiatives like a shift to Web-based services is as yet unknown. The buzzword in federal information technology spending this year is "cloud computing" - the outsourcing of IT services to software and hardware providers. But that ...

Is administration more interested in transparency of Congress?

August 17, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Obama administration has moved faster to create transparency for its rivals than for federal agencies under its management, some open government activists claim. Critics point to unrealistic goals in creating a directive for transparency and foot-dragging in posting bills online for comment before the president signs them. Meanwhile, the ...

From Nextgov.com: Is administration more interested in transparency of Congress?

August 17, 2009 The Obama administration has moved faster to create transparency for its rivals than for federal agencies under its management, some open government activists claim. Read the full story on Nextgov.com.

Cloudy Outlook

August 15, 2009 The impact of Obama IT initiatives like a shift to Web-based services is as yet unknown. The buzzword in federal information technology spending this year is "cloud computing"-the outsourcing of IT services to software and hardware providers. But that migration will have to wait for future budget cycles. The fiscal ...

Birthers and Transparency

August 14, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Programmers may extract data from a White House-led online discussion about transparency to analyze the influence of participants who are out to prove that President Obama is not a natural born U.S. citizen. Since May, the administration has been seeking public input on a forthcoming presidential directive on open government ...

Firm awaits decision on whether Defense will disclose contractor ratings

August 14, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Obama administration, committed to becoming the most transparent in history, upheld a Bush-era practice of denying taxpayers access to a Defense Department database that tracks contractor performance. An appeal to a recent Freedom of Information Act request is pending, but industry groups say they are confident Defense will respect ...

Stimulus Reporting Process Starts

August 13, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Stimulus money recipients can start on Monday the process of reporting their spending and job creation statistics to the public. FederalReporting.gov, a password-protected data collection site, will allow recipients next week to register for submitting spending reports. That data will feed into maps, charts, downloadable data sets and other interactive ...

Social Security e-health records requirements draw fire

August 12, 2009 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Certification requirements for $24 million in Recovery Act contracts aimed at automating the Social Security Administration's medical disability program could slow technological innovation, according to Microsoft officials and health information technology specialists. A solicitation for proposals that the agency issued on Friday -- intended to cut the time it has ...