AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Alexis Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal Alexis Madrigal is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Technology channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. The New York Observer calls Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti. He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press). Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.
Results 51-60 of 85

Cell Networks Use Much More Energy Than Data Centers

April 15, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow For years, people have talked about the electricity consumption of data centers. Some people want to believe, somehow, that Googling is energy intensive. But it's not. Thanks to Koomey's Corollary to Moore's Law, computation has been getting more energy efficient: The number of computations per kilowatt-hour of electricity usage has ...

Emerging Infectious Diseases, Better Public Health Outcomes, and Zombies

April 5, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Perhaps the public's obsession with zombies can be refracted from horror movies and towards health issues, suggests a new paper in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. The hope is that zombies can do for public health awareness what they did for Jane Austen: tack on some zombies and suddenly boring ...

The True Story of the Government Programs That Tried to Build an Atomic Heart

March 22, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow In 1967, the National Heart Institute and the Atomic Energy Agency began a ten-year effort to develop an artificial heart powered by plutonium-238. The atomic hearts would have pumped human blood with the energy provided by the radioactive decay of that isotope. The effort failed thanks to technical challenges, intra-governmental ...

The Best Intelligence Is Cyborg Intelligence

March 12, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow A quick pointer to today's A1 New York Times story on a phenomenon we've been following on this blog for the past year: as algorithmic entities explode across the web, humans remain central to their operation. Automation only goes so far and for all Watson's Jeopardy wins, there are still ...

Here Comes the Parade of Computing Interfaces That Want to Replace the Touchscreen

February 27, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The interfaces are coming! Over the next six months or so, we're going to see an explosion of new ways of interacting with computers, televisions, and mobile devices. Many of them are radical departures from the way things have been done, which is exciting. I'll run several down in this ...

How Much YouTube Do Employees Really Watch at Work?

February 25, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The number of YouTube videos employees watch is not exactly the kind of number tracked by corporate analysts or released by companies. Suffice to say, on the evidence of being a human being in the white-collar workforce, I have long been sure that the number of YouTube videos watched on ...

How Big Data Can Catch Oxycontin Abusers and Bad Docs

February 22, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Prescription drug overdose deaths are up. "Diversion" of drugs for recreational use costs the health care system $72.5 billion a year, according to National Drug Intelligence Center report. And yet there are obviously literally billions of legitimate prescriptions that help sick people, which come through our nation's pharmacies. How do ...

Video: Russian Meteor Was the Biggest in a Century

February 15, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The meteor we all saw streaking across YouTube from Russian dashboard cameras was the largest in a century, a scientist who studied the event told Nature's Geoff Brumfiel. That would make it the biggest rock to hit the Earth since 1908's Tunguska wiped out a big old patch of Siberia. ...

And Now Let Us Praise, and Consider the Absurd Luck of, Famous Men

February 13, 2013 A couple of weeks ago, Twitter and Square co-founder Jack Dorsey tweeted this: At first, snuffling through a head cold, I wrote several snarky responses -- e.g. " 'Success is never accidental,' said all multimillionaire white men." -- but never tweeted them. Because I've seen a lot of successful people ...

Walter Cronkite Demonstrates the Home of the Future in 1967

February 13, 2013 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Sometimes, I take the remote control and the hardware and software it controls for granted. Increasingly complex television choices have overtaxed our television user interfaces. We ask too much of the humble remote, and so it disappoints for simple tasks like searching for a movie on cable. But things could ...