AUTHOR ARCHIVES

Alexis Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal Alexis Madrigal is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he oversees the Technology channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. The New York Observer calls Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti. He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press). Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.
Results 101-108 of 108

Curiosity scientists select random rock on Mars to shoot with laser

August 20, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Meet the most boring rock in the world. It's probably basalt, an igneous rock, which makes it like many, many other rocks and pebbles all over the world. What makes it interesting is that the world in question is Mars, and this random little piece of stone happens to be...

Video: Where the Mars Curiosity Rover is headed next

August 10, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow So far, most of the excitement about the Curiosity rover has sprung from its precise landing and its first surroundings, the floor of the Gale Crater. But the rover is meant to rove, and rove it will. Today, in a press briefing, Dawn Sumner, a UC Davis geologist on the...

To model the simplest microbe in the world, you need 128 computers

July 24, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Mycoplasma genitalium has one of the smallest genomes of any free-living organism in the world, clocking in at a mere 525 genes. That's a fraction of the size of even another bacterium like E. coli, which has 4,288 genes. M. genitalium's diminutive genome made it the first target for Stanford...

Mitt Romney's algorithmic campaign

July 20, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Sasha Issenberg has a fascinating exploration of the analytical approach at the heart of the Romney campaign. All campaigns use a lot of data these days, but the Romney team is drawing on a new, rich dataset: President Obama's appearances and ad buys themselves. Every detail of Obama's campaigning is...

Government agency recruits via the source code of its web page

July 10, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is looking for a few good technology and design fellows to help them out. Where might they find ideal candidates? Perhaps in the pool of people who go to their website AND want to see the code behind the page. So, they inserted an advertisement...

Hey, brother, can you spare a Hubble? DoD: Sure! Have two

June 4, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow NASA's been wracked by budgetary concerns as it tries to figure out how to do research into the origins of everything *and* loft human beings into orbit with big rockets. In particular, the space agency has been dealing with cost overruns on the next-generation Hubble, the James Webb Space Telescope,...

The philosopher whose fingerprints are all over the FTC's new approach to privacy

March 30, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow PALO ALTO -- A mile or two away from Facebook's headquarters in Silicon Valley, Helen Nissenbaum of New York University was standing in a basement on Stanford's campus explaining that the entire way that we've thought about privacy on the Internet is wrong. It was not a glorious setting. The...

White House email was down for 23% of Obama's first 40 days

March 15, 2012 FROM NEXTGOV arrow Man, you think your corporate email's got problems. In an interview with Computerworld, outgoing White House CIO Brook Colangelo revealed that the official White House email was down for nearly a quarter of the first 40 days that President Obama was in office. Remember that time Gmail went down a...