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Adam Grant

Professor, Wharton Business School July 31, 2012Whart, ... ] Adam Grant is the youngest tenured professor at Wharton. He has been recognized as Wharton’s single-highest-rated teacher, one of BusinessWeek’s favorite professors, and one of the world’s 40 best business professors under 40. Previously, he was a record-setting advertising director at Let’s Go Publications, an All-American springboard diver, and a professional magician. Adam is the author of the New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestseller Give and Take: A Revolutionary Approach to Success. He earned his Ph.D. in organizational psychology from the University of Michigan, completing it in less than three years, and his B.A. from Harvard University, magna cum laude with highest honors and Phi Beta Kappa honors. He has been honored with the Excellence in Teaching Award for every class that he has taught and has presented for leaders at organizations such as Google, the NFL, Merck, Pixar, Goldman Sachs, Facebook, Microsoft, Apple, the United Nations, the World Economic Forum, and the U.S. Army, Navy, and Air Force.
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Facebook Alert: You’re Not My Friend

July 31, 2014 Recently, someone I’ve never met introduced me in an email as “my good friend Adam.” A few days later, a virtual stranger who has emailed me a few times posted an article by “my friend Adam.” Then a student listed me as a job reference, and when asked to describe ...

Should Teammates Get Equal Pay?

July 22, 2014 In 1998, the Seattle Mariners won 76 games and traded away their star hitter, Ken Griffey Jr. In 1999, they won 79 games and traded away their star pitcher, Randy Johnson. In 2000, they won 91 games and watched their remaining star, Alex Rodriguez, leave. Having lost their three best ...

3 Words You Shouldn't Say About Yourself

June 3, 2014 When we interact with other people, what do we want? As I started to study that question, I came across a wonderful quote. “There are two kinds of people in the world,” Robert Benchley wrote. “Those who divide the world into two kinds of people, and those who don’t.” Psychologists ...

If You Do This, Your Emails Might Be Rude

May 19, 2014 When we walk up to introduce ourselves to strangers, we intuitively follow basic cultural rules of politeness. Don’t launch into a monologue about yourself. Don’t look over their shoulder to see if someone more important is nearby. Don’t invade personal space, or you’ll be branded as a close talker. On ...

Leadership Lessons from Children’s Books

May 8, 2014 Being a leader is a complex task, but the defining moments of great leadership can be surprisingly simple. As a father of three kids under six, I’ve noticed some striking parallels between the morals of bedtime stories and the legacies of illustrious leaders. If I were building a leadership library, ...

Why Men Don’t Stand Up for Their Female Colleagues

April 29, 2014 The percent of women in executive-officer positions at Fortune 500 companies has stagnated at less than 15. As more women "lean in: and we collectively continue to fight sexism, there’s another barrier to progress that hasn’t been addressed: Many men who would like to see more women leaders are afraid ...

You're Looking for Help in All the Wrong Places

April 22, 2014 Several decades ago, a team of experts built the world's most expensive mirror. It was for the Hubble Space Telescope, and the mirror was the key to focusing light that predated the stars, capturing images that had never been seen by human eyes. The precision was measured in millionths of ...

The Most Valuable Management Degree Doesn’t Exist

April 10, 2014 Once upon a time, the field of medicine was riddled with danger. Doctors made up cures based on individual experience, inflicting horrors on patients—lobotomy, anyone? Everything changed with the advent of evidence-based medicine. With randomized, controlled trials and careful longitudinal studies, we learned about effective treatments and risky behaviors. We ...

How Not to Introduce a Speaker

April 2, 2014 When I attend a presentation, the first thing that captures my attention isn’t the speaker or the material. It’s the person who introduces the speaker. After giving a few hundred speeches in the past year, I’ve been struck by the variety of ways that different people introduce the same speaker. ...

How to Become Productively Generous

March 24, 2014 In Western culture, many people define success narrowly as money and power. In her uplifting book Thrive, Arianna Huffington argues that this leaves us sitting on a two-legged stool, which will tip over if we don’t add a third leg. She makes a passionate case, supported by science, for expanding ...