Pay parity supporters push for 3.4 percent civilian raise

Advocates of pay parity are asking the House Appropriations Committee to give civilian federal workers the 3.4 percent annual pay raise a separate panel approved for the military as part of the fiscal 2010 Defense authorization bill.

That figure is 0.5 percentage points higher than the 2.9 percent 2010 pay hike President Obama requested for the military in his February budget outline, and 1.4 percentage points more than his recommended civilian pay boost. Obama said at the time that the smaller civilian raise would bring "federal pay and benefit practices more in line with the private sector," which is suffering from the economic downturn.

"Federal employees work side by side with military personnel both here and abroad and deserve to be recognized for their extraordinary efforts," House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Rep. Edolphus Towns, D-N.Y., and Federal Workforce Subcommittee Chairman Stephen Lynch, D-Mass., wrote to House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rep. David Obey, D-Wis., on June 22. "Civilian employees serving at [Defense], FBI, State, [Homeland Security], and at many other agencies support the men and women of the armed forces and work tirelessly to ensure the security of our nation."

Freshman Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., called for pay parity in March, but did not name a figure. Lynch earlier this year said he would ask for as much as a 3.9 percent pay raise for both military and civilian employees.

Colleen Kelley, president of the National Treasury Employees Union, said on Wednesday that pay parity was an important principle that Congress should continue to uphold.

"Whatever the number, NTEU fully supports pay parity between civilian and military employees," she said.

Stay up-to-date with federal news alerts and analysis — Sign up for GovExec's email newsletters.
FROM OUR SPONSORS
JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Close [ x ] More from GovExec
 
 

Thank you for subscribing to newsletters from GovExec.com.
We think these reports might interest you:

  • Forecasting Cloud's Future

    Conversations with Federal, State, and Local Technology Leaders on Cloud-Driven Digital Transformation

    Download
  • The Big Data Campaign Trail

    With everyone so focused on security following recent breaches at federal, state and local government and education institutions, there has been little emphasis on the need for better operations. This report breaks down some of the biggest operational challenges in IT management and provides insight into how agencies and leaders can successfully solve some of the biggest lingering government IT issues.

    Download
  • Communicating Innovation in Federal Government

    Federal Government spending on ‘obsolete technology’ continues to increase. Supporting the twin pillars of improved digital service delivery for citizens on the one hand, and the increasingly optimized and flexible working practices for federal employees on the other, are neither easy nor inexpensive tasks. This whitepaper explores how federal agencies can leverage the value of existing agency technology assets while offering IT leaders the ability to implement the kind of employee productivity, citizen service improvements and security demanded by federal oversight.

    Download
  • IT Transformation Trends: Flash Storage as a Strategic IT Asset

    MIT Technology Review: Flash Storage As a Strategic IT Asset For the first time in decades, IT leaders now consider all-flash storage as a strategic IT asset. IT has become a new operating model that enables self-service with high performance, density and resiliency. It also offers the self-service agility of the public cloud combined with the security, performance, and cost-effectiveness of a private cloud. Download this MIT Technology Review paper to learn more about how all-flash storage is transforming the data center.

    Download
  • Ongoing Efforts in Veterans Health Care Modernization

    This report discusses the current state of veterans health care

    Download

When you download a report, your information may be shared with the underwriters of that document.