Number of minorities in senior-level federal positions increasing

By Amanda Palleschi

March 21, 2012

In the past 10 years, federal workers who identify as Hispanic or Latino, along with African-American and Asian employees, have made the most gains in securing senior-level positions across the federal government, according to a new report from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

The commission’s Annual Report on the Federal Work Force Part II: Workforce Statistics provides profiles and trends for 64 federal agencies, and identifies participation rates by race, gender, national origin and individuals with targeted disabilities, across major occupational categories.

Of the 2.8 million people federal government employed in fiscal 2010, 56 percent were men, 44 percent were women, 65.4 percent were white, 17.9 percent were black or African-American, 8.9 percent were Hispanic or Latino, 5.9 percent were Asian, 1.6 percent were American Indian or Alaska natives, .08 percent identified as two or more races, and 0.04 percent were Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander.

According to the report, there has been little change in the composition of the federal workforce over the years. And the report noted that between fiscal 2009 and fiscal 2010, minority women, men of two or more races, and white women “remained below their overall availability in the national civilian labor force.”

The number of employees with targeted disabilities -- deafness, blindness, missing extremities, partial or complete paralysis, convulsive disorders, mental retardation, mental illness and distortion of the limb or spine -- remained static at 0.88 percent, according to the report.

“This report shows that while the federal government is a leader in employing a diverse workforce, specific areas for improvement remains,” EEOC Chair Jacqueline A. Berrien said in a statement Wednesday.

Correction: Based on incorrect information provided by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, this story initially stated that number of federal workers who identify as Hispanic or Latino increased slightly between fiscal years 2009 and 2010.  The article has been updated to correct the error.


By Amanda Palleschi

March 21, 2012

http://www.govexec.com/management/2012/03/number-minorities-senior-level-federal-positions-increasing/41533/