Leadership Lessons From Queen Elizabeth II

By Scott Eblin

June 6, 2012

The past few days in London have marked the Diamond Jubilee celebrating the 60th year of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II. It’s been a pomp and circumstance extravaganza, and the members of the Royal Family have all had parts to play.

One thing the Windsors appear to understand better than anyone is that appearances matter for people in leadership roles – ceremonial or otherwise. This point was brilliantly summarized in a New York Times article over the weekend called The Outfits That Say “The Queen.” The piece opens with a line that the Queen is reported to have said in private: “I have to be seen to be believed.”

It’s a sneakily smart observation because it goes beyond what you would typically think of when you hear that someone or some thing has to be seen to be believed. The idea usually means that something is so over the top that you literally have to see it to believe it. In the case of Queen Elizabeth, I think it tells us that she completely understands that any belief in the value of the British monarchy is dependent on the image that she (and her family) project.

In The Next Level, I encourage leaders to pick up a big footprint view of their role and let go of a small footprint view. As the events of the past week illustrate, the Queen takes the impact of her footprint seriously. So, there is literally only one Queen of England, but if you dial the pageantry back, I think there are some applicable lessons from Queen Elizabeth for leaders in any walk of life:

 

What else is there for leaders to learn from Queen Elizabeth II?


By Scott Eblin

June 6, 2012

http://www.govexec.com/excellence/executive-coach/2012/06/leadership-lessons-queen-elizabeth-ii/56107/